Sunset Hospital Dalkeith

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Cycled around the old Sunset Hospital site on the foreshore at Dalkeith this morning, it’s just been opened to the public having been closed and fenced off for over 20 years. Built in 1904 as the “Claremont Old Men’s Home” it was renamed as “Sunset Hospital” in 1941 when it became a hospital for returned servicemen and later a public hospital for men and women. Most of the 13 buildings are still fenced…. off presumably awaiting renovation. There are new BBQ facilities, children’s adventure playground and good seating underneath massive Moreton Bay Fig trees which overlook the Swan river. Current renovations have been financed by selling off part of the land to the Sultan of Johor, the long term plan is to preserve the heritage listed buildings for future arts, culture and community use.

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Finally….. a quick sketch of the Perth skyline from Matilda Bay Tearooms (which have also been renovated).

The Glass Man – Amelie

201512000An homage to the “Glass Man” in one of my favourite films..”Amelie”. Played by Serge Merlin who creates the character of Raymond Dufayel an artist with brittle bone disease who repaints Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party every year….Although he has copied the same painting 20 times, he has never quite captured the look of the girl drinking a glass of water….until Amelie falls in love.

De Atramentis Black Document ink in Lamy Safari EF fountain pen, Liquitex black acrylic ink in Pentel waterbrush, Inktense pencils wetted with Pentel waterbrush on Quill 125gsm cover paper.

Head Scribbles….to colour or not to colour….Inktense

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Following on from my recent round up of last years scribble collection I’m starting to go through all the odds and ends of drawing/painting materials I’ve collected. Yesterday I rediscovered a set of 12 Derwent Inktense pencils that I bought about 6 months ago but was initially frustrated with the colours and effects I was getting….

The above pictures are a couple of scribbly faces drawn last evening, random faces I liked the expression, drawn with a Lamy Safari EF fountain pen then dark areas enhanced with a Pentel waterbrush filled with Liquitex black acylic ink.

I decided to try colouring the second head with the Inktense pencils….when I first started using the Inktense I found the colour too unpredictable – the dry colour is quite different to the wetted colour.

Then I had a little “EUREKA” moment…..I’m finding it best to draw lightly with the Inktense pencils, then wet the painting with a brush/waterbrush to create background colour…. Next go over with the Inktense pencils again whilst the paper is still wet….gives a pleasing scribbly effect and I have some idea of the colours they’re going to produce.

The Inktense are quite different to watercolour pencils….much more powerful colours (hence the name) and more importantly you can’t lift out Inktense once you’ve wetted them….they are permanent on the page. (Watercolour pencils are easier to use as they are generally softer colours, don’t have such a large colour-shift after adding water plus you can lift colour out…essentially you know what colour you’re going to get and have more chance to remedy when mistakes happen).

I could probably achieved a similar effect with ordinary coloured pencils but it would have taken longer…. it’s nice to be able to produce background colours and then bold colourful lines in just a few minutes with just a handful of pencils and a waterbrush….

May have to conduct some more Inktense experiments….